Homework 2012

Category Archives

Agita Virsnite: find the balance between virtual and real

The balance between virtual and real. How not to lose any of these values.
Google books, e-books, , e-readers, paper format.
But….. what holds back?

Moowing forward- personal tranzision.

Agita Virsnite

Katia Shklyar: multicultural library?


Nowadays in Finland and in many other countries are a lot of talks about immigration and the role of newcomers in the society. Library is not an exception and as “a place which is open for anyone” it gets even more pressure. Some libraries want to develop as “multicultural”. But what does it mean? Is it really necessary to develop “special” “multicultural” services (for immigrants)? So dear colleagues, I want your opinions about the issue and some examples of successful and/or failed initiatives.

Katia Shklyar

Juha Kortesluoma: public living rooms vs. peace and quiet


Many (or at least some) public libraries are evolving to be more and more like event venues and public living rooms. Living room like children’s and youth’s sections with video games etc. have been popular among younger patrons and parents have liked them too. On the other hand, many people think that libraries should be places of peace and quiet. How would it be possible to combine these two opposite interests? Is the only possible solution to profile libraries as public living room/event libraries or as quiet libraries (or if the library is big enough, to provide separate sections for both purposes)? Is time up for quiet public libraries?

Juha Kortesluoma

Kaisa Inkeroinen: What means good quality of customer service to us and what it means to our customers?


What means good quality of customer service to us and what it means to our
customers? Do we consider same things as good customer service? And how to measure it? I’d like to find some new revolutionary method other than surveys or these happy face or not so happy face machines.

Kaisa Inkeroinen

Ilze Marga: How to organize events in the city center?


How to organize events in the city center? I have good practice now but I will be pleased to know the experience of others. And languages practice, of course, too.

Ilze Marga

Anssi Sajama: library fees—what should be free for all?


Does your library have services that cost? Libraries should have equal services for everybody, which usually means that the library use is free of charge except for material fees (i.g like copying paper) and fines (i.g for returning books late). In what cases can the library have fees on a service and not put its customers in an unequal position?

Anssi Sajama

Hilde Nelissen: the library in 2020?


Where are we going and how can I keep up with the fast changing library world ? As a solo-librarian I’m daily challenged: I want to inform myself to keep my users informed … but also have to keep the library running. How do other solo-librarians manage ? I hope to learn from you all about databases and interesting websites. And of course I’m specially interested in learning from university- and scientific libraries.

I recently engaged myself to a group who’s doing project in developing countries. I really want to work on this topic as well because this is again, like this biketrip, a professional and personal challenge.

I’m ready to share my experience and learn from you all so I can start working again after this trip with renewed energy !

Hilde Nelissen

Ingrida Bučionytė: what do you need to do or know to become a helpful information tool for a doctor?


I’ve just started my job in the library of medicine. So it’s very interesting how coleagues from other medical libraries work these days. What do you need to do or know to become a helpful information tool for a doctor?

Ingrida Bučionytė

Raimonda Mockutė: debtors


I‘m working in academical library. And we have a problem with the students who terminate their studies – they leave university and forget (or don‘t want) to return books to the library. Maybe someone of you have valuable experience how to recover books from these debtors?

Raimonda Mockutė

Sören Niehäuser: The library as the main learning space in university – chance or risk?


Historically, the function of libraries in Colleges and Universities has been to store printed media and provide it to teachers and scholars for learning and research. As it was often not allowed to take books on loan to work at home, the library also has a long tradition of being a „Learning Centre“ where students sooner or later will have to come to work.

All that described above has changed a lot since a couple of years. Online ressources, E-books etc. have become more and more important, students have become more and more mobile in their work with Laptops etc.

Interestingly, as the library environment has the reputation of beeing a good place to learn, at least in Germany the use of library buildings as learning space has to the joy of the library officials,not decreased, but in the contrary, significantly increased, much aided by the provision of of highspeed W-Lan, Power Sockets etc.

With that developments in mind, it seems easy to argue: „We (as Library/Librarians) will remain very important in the academic world as we are the preffered learning environment which we provide to the students together with our information ressources, print and online.“ But will that be the case? University officials in Germany sometimes argue: „Well, objectively seen the refectory can provide learning space as well, as can multi-function seminar rooms etc., there is no need to focus on the library when it comes to learning space, its just a question of the right technical equipment, furniture etc.“

Nontheless it seems that students prefer libraries for their learning, even if the university provides learning space somewhere else. Undoubtedly thats a nice thing for us as librarians, but that leads to important questions:
Is being a „Learning space“ the future of the library? Can providing space for learning really compensate the possible loss of the importance of physically accessed media?

And more practical: What makes a library such a good learning space that it will be the long term winner of the „competion of the different learning spaces“? What can, on the long run, the library offer that other service providers can’t?

Sören Niehäuser

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