Info

Category Archives

Cycling for Libraries Seminar: Discussion and Debate in Norwegian Libraries

hioa-logo-org-no

 

Join us at Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA) to welcome Cycling for Libraries participants to Norway and learn about how Norwegian libraries are responding to the Norwegian Library Law that mandates libraries serve as public arenas for discussion and debate. All librarians, LIS students and lovers of libraries are welcome to attend!

Time: August 31, 2015 from 13:00 to 16:00

Location: Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA), Pilestredet 48, room P568

Preliminary Schedule

13:00-13:15 Jamie Johnston, PhD Candidate HiOA & Cycling for Libraries Organizer

13:15-13:30 Ann-Christin Gramming, Law Librarian & Cycling for Libraries Organizer

13:30-14:00 Ragnar Audunson, Professor HiOA

14:00-14:30 Marianne Julin Montgomery, Section Leader HiOA Learning Center and Libraries

15:00-15:30 Kristen Danielsen, Library Director Deichman

15:30-16:00 Aslak Sira Myhre, National library

Reception 16:30-18:30

The seminar will be held in English

Welcome!

Jamie Johnston

PhD Candidate, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences Email: Jamie.Johnston@hioa.no


Cycling for libraries receives economic support for seminar on librarian competencies

Greta Linder

 

We have just received news that we have been selected as this years recipient of “the Greta Linder grant”. The grant is managed by DIK, the professional association and trade union for librarians. The money will go towards a seminar on the ferry between Gothenburg (S) and Fredrikshavn (DK) where we will discuss librarian competencies. The seminar will be open to Cycling for library particpants as well as Nordic colleagues.

Location: Mistral, Stena Danica

Final program:

08:30-08:45  Boarding in Gothenburg
08:55 – 09:15 Swedish fika
09:15 – 09:20 Opening of the conference

09:20 – 10:00 What do you do all day?
What is is like to work as a corporate librarian or at a Fablab? Elinor Magnusson, SCA Hygiene Products & Rasmus Fangel Vestergaard, Copenhagen libraries

10:00 – 10:30 Fika and opportunity to network

10:30 – 12:00 The skills and competencies required by librarians in the future (panel discussion)
Moderator – Robin Neidorf
Bo Jacobsen, library boss at Vesthimmerlands Biblioteker
Ingrid Johansson, lecturer at University of Borås, Library & information science
Rasmus Fangel Vestergaard, Copenhagen Public Librariesn works with the new library strategy
Ann-Christin Karlén Gramming, has researched the identity, competences and professional development of corporate librarians

Information about the joint Nordic Master in Cultural Leadership, Linnea Lindsköld ( University of Borås)
Read information here

 

12:00 – 12:15 closing, wrap up

Arrival Fredrikshavn: 12:30

The seminar is also supported by SFIS, the Swedish Association of Information specialists

Greta Linder, 1888-1963, was a pioneer in regards to the development of Swedish public libraries and the librarian profession. She attended library school at the New York Public Library 1915-1916 and brought back many ideas regarding cataloguing that were implemented in Swedish public libraries. She later worked as a library consultant training other librarians. She loved to travel. Sje made numerous study trips to Denmark, Norway, England and Germany and she encouraged her younger colleagues to do the same.

Source:
I G Margareta (Greta) Linder, http://sok.riksarkivet.se/sbl/artikel/10520, Svenskt biografiskt lexikon (art av Elise Adelsköld), 2015-06-24.

 


Gothenburg

logo_gothenburg_2010_medium

Gothenburg is Sweden’s second largest city with 600 000 inhabitants. It is situated at the west coast of Sweden and has a reputation for being clean, safe and green, with a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. In 2010 Gothenburg was host to the 2010 World Library and Information Congress.

Libraries of Gothenburg

Public libraries

The library network of Gothenburg consists of the centrally located Gothenburg City Library and 24 branch libraries for the different city districts, as well as two mobile libraries.

Academic libraries

The Gothenburg University Library (Swedish: Göteborgs universitetsbibliotek) consists of ten separate libraries, including Learning Resource Centres. The Gothenburg University Library is one of the most frequented research libraries in Sweden, with 1.6 million visits per year.
Chalmers Library is a university research library specializing in science and technology.

Medical and hospital libraries

The Sahlgrenska University Hospital have medical libraries at Mölndal hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Östra hospital. The libraries provide service to the hospital staff. There is also BUS,  a children’s library at Queen Silvias Hospital (part of Östra hospital).

Getting there

By air

The international airport Landvetter (GOT) is located 20 kilometres south-east of the city centre and you can travel from various destinations in Europa and the world. Please note that the smaller Göteborg City Airport (GSE) is no longer in use for commercial flights and will be phased out as from the winter 2015. Buses operate from Landvetter Airport to the Central Station, (Nils Ericson Terminal), in Gothenburg four times per hour. If you plan to take a taxi, make sure you get a authentic taxi Göteborg (look for the logo – a man with a cap – on the door) in order not to get ripped off. The fixed price is around 415 SEK to get from Landvetter into the city centre.

By bus and train

The bus station, Nils Ericson Terminalen, is next to the train station. Swebus Express operates frequent buses to most major towns and cities as well as Oslo (NO). For 100 SEK you bring your bike on board. There is also Nettbus (for Oslo and Copenhagen) but they don’t allow bikes on board. The journey time is around 3,5 hours from Oslo, 6,5 hours from Stockholm, 3,5 hours from Malmö and 5 hours from Copenhagen.
SJ, Västtrafik, Öresundståge, Tågab, NSB and Blå tåget are running frequent services to and from the central station in Gothenburg, connecting the city with the Scandinavian capitals Stockholm, Oslo and Copenhagen. No bikes (except folding bikes) allowed on SJ. Bikes are allowed (buy an additional childrens ticket) on Öresundståget that connects to Copenhagen (DK) as well as Karlshamn (ferries to Klaipeida).

By ferry

Stena Lines ferries run to/from Kiel (DE) and Fredrikshavn (DK).

Accomodation

STF Vandrarhem Stigbergsliden – close to the ferry
STF Göteborg City Vandrarhem – brand new and in the city centre, close to the train station
Masthuggsterrassens Vandrarhem  – close to the ferry
Spar hotel Majorna

More info

The weekender’s guide to Gothenburg
48 h in Gothenburg


Aarhus

Stemning-v.-kaffebar-Latinerkvarteret_photopop

Aarhus is the second-largest city in Denmark; a centre of culture with countless museums and galleries.It’s also a university city. 13% of Aarhus’ population are students, making Aarhus the youngest city in Denmark. Aarhus has also recently been named European Capital of Culture 2017.

Getting there

By air

There are several airports in the Aarhus vincinity. Aarhus airport, also known as Tirstrup airport, is 45km northeast of the city. Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) has daily flights to/from Copenhagen International Airport (flying time 35 minutes); Sun-Air (affiliated with British Airways) operates direct connections to Stockholm, Gothenburg and Oslo. Ryanair has daily connections to/from London (Stansted). The bus from Tirstrup to Aarhus costs DKK 100 one way (travel time approx. 50 minutes). The final stop is the train station in the center of Aarhus
There is also an aiport in Billund (where you can visit Legoland as well!). The bus ride from Billund to Aarhus takes approximately 1.5 hours, and costs app. DKK 180 (one way).center.

By boat

If you are travelling to and from other Scandinavian countries, there are ferries to Northern Jutland (Frederikshavn, Hirtshals or Grenå). Mols Linien operates ferries to Odden and Kalundborg

By train or bus

Rødbus is the cheapest transport from Copenhagen (among other cities) to Aarhus. Ticket prices around 100 kr. Abildskou operates buses from Copenhagen (Valby Station), Copenhagen Airport, Hamburg Airport and Berlin. Eurolines operates buses to and from Hamburg.  All regional and long-distance buses stop at Aarhus bus station, 300m northeast of the train station.
All trains arrive and depart from  Aarhus Hovedbanegård (Aarhus H). Trains to Copenhagen (via the airport) (one way Dkr382, three to 3½ hours), via Odense (Dkr240, 1¾ hours), leave Aarhus roughly half-hourly. Check out the timetables at dsb.dk. Danish railways are cyclist-friendly, with special spaces for bicycles on trains but you need to purchase a separate ticket for your bike.

Accomodation in Aarhus

Cabinn – rooms with bunks and double rooms right in the centre of town
Danhostel Aarhus – idyllically situated in Riis Skov Park, 3 km from central Aarhus
City Sleep-in – basic hostel in Havnegade, 5 min from the train station.
Aarhus Hostel
– located the Aarhus suburb of Hasselager, 10 km away from central Aarhus
Scandic City Hotel centrally located in Aarhus

Check out the reduced prices for Next library attendees! You book accomodation on the Next library registration.

More

Get tips on what to do and see in Aarhus based on how you are feeling
Aarhus, Denmark: a cultural city guide


Oslo


Between the Oslofjord and the forests lies the Norwegian capital. Oslo has a special combination of city life and easy access to the great outdoors.

Getting there

By air

There are several aiports in the Oslo vincinity. Oslo Gardermoen International Airport has a motorway and high-speed rail link to the city centre. KLM, Widerøe, SAS Braathens, Ryanair and other airlines also operate ‘Oslo’ services to/from Torp International Airport, some 123km southwest of Oslo, and Rygge Airport, around 60km southeast of the centre.

By boat

Ferries operated by DFDS Seaways connect Oslo daily with Denmark from the Vippetangen Quay off Skippergata. Bus 60 stops within a couple of minutes’ walk of the terminal.

In the summer there are Color Line Ferries that run daily to/from Kiel (Germany). The boats dock at Hjortneskaia, west of the central harbour. You can take tram 13 from Oslo S, bus 33 or the Color Line bus, which leaves from platform 7 of the central bus terminal one hour before boat departures.

By train or bus

Long-distance buses arrive and depart from the Galleri Oslo Bus Terminal; the train and bus stations are linked via a convenient overhead walkway for easy connections. Nor-Way Bussekspress has the biggest range of services. International services also depart from the bus terminal.

All trains arrive and depart from Oslo S in the city centre. Check out timetables at nsb.no.

Accomodation in Oslo

Anker hotel
Anker hostel
Oslo Hostel Central – Norway’s newest hostel located in the city centre
Oslo Hostel Haraldsheim – located at Grefsen, 4 km from the city center

More

Visitoslo.com
Spotted by locals, Oslo
Oslo on a budget – from wild camping to city highlights for less

 


Do you need a visa?

Citizens of certain countries will find that they need a visa in order to enter Norway and attend the start of the conference. The same might be applicable if you choose to join in Sweden or Denmark. If you plan to visit Norway for less than 90 days, you can apply for a visitor’s visa. With this visa you can visit all Schengen countries, including Sweden and Denmark. More info about visa requirement in Norway here.

If you do need a visa, please contact us quickly for a letter of invitation, as the application process may take up to three months depending on your country. 

Important information regarding Visa Invitation Letters (please read):

  • Your name must be listed exactly as it appears on your passport. Any differences between the name on your passport and the name on your invitation letter or other documentation could lead to a delay and/or denial of your visa.
  • Please note that each individual requesting an invitation letter must fill out a separate form.
  • All letters will be sent in PDF form to the email address provided. If a paper letter is required, please respond to the email. Requested paper letters will be sent complimentary through airmail. This option may take a few weeks to arrive.

How to Request a Visa Invitation Letter          

Individuals requiring letters of invitation to obtain travel visas must apply using the online form.


Welcome to the Hague by Ingrid Van Engelshoven

Ingrid Van Engelshoven

Ladies and gentlemen, Welcome to the Library Capital of the World. As you can imagine, I say this with a certain amount of pride.

The Hague is internationally known as the legal capital of the world. Our city attracts more than thirty thousand expats who work at multinationals such as Siemens or Shell. But we are also famous for our UN organisations such as the OPCW, the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and the Peace Palace. The Peace Palace, which houses the UN International Court of Justice, is one hundred years old this year.

We will be celebrating this jubilee in several ways, one of which is the Vredesloop Den Haag, a running event initiated by another organisation celebrating its one hundredth anniversary and which is the largest athletic association in The Hague: Haag Atletiek. I myself will be participating in the 10k run.

But you are certainly not sitting still either. You are cycling through the Netherlands. Actually, you are giving us a preview of the Tour de France! There is no better way to get to know our country. There is no better way to get to know each other. After all, this is actually what the tour is all about: an international meeting of professionals.

Today, you are stopping in The Hague. And we want to receive you properly. We are doing this in the heart of Dutch democracy: the Binnenhof. This is the podium for political debate. This is also the best place to talk about the future of our libraries.

Free, unlimited access to information. For every person living in The Hague. This is the main focus for how libraries in The Hague operate. The library sees this as a basic democratic right. This is why they provide such services as free use of WiFi and free access to more than a thousand international newspapers and documents issued by international organisations such as the OPCW. The library’s information specialists provide help in finding the right sources of information. For every person living in The Hague: young or old, highly educated or not, regardless of ethnicity or nationality.

The Hague Public Library promotes itself as the living room for the city, district or neighbourhood as based on the idea of the library being a ‘third place’. It offers a safe environment – the kind of environment you need for free access to information. It offers the perfect place for undisturbed study. It’s the ideal location for interacting with others living in the same district. The Hague Public Library creates no barriers. Our doors are open wide. To people living in our city, for institutions that can offer them something, and for tourists. Our library houses the city’s legal advice centre and the Tourist Information Office. It serves the city and the Municipal Health Service as an information centre. And for people who are unfamiliar with using computers, the library provides targeted training activities and assistance with completing digital forms.

Encouraging media familiarity, language skills and reading for young and old. These are the priorities in our policy. With its training activities in media familiarity, the library is acquainting citizens with new means of digital communication. With its language courses, it is offering immigrants access to the world of information available in Dutch. Not only immigrants but ten percent of ethnic minorities lack sufficient language skills in Dutch.

More and more, the library is becoming a place to work. And I support this development. Traditionally, the library has been a place where citizens find and use information; now it is also becoming an important place for them to generate information. Come and take a look on the fifth floor of the central library sometime. You’ll find dozens of students working here no matter what day you visit. Then you can see what I mean for yourself. Students enjoy the quiet they find here. They also find the information they need for good academic achievement. And best of all: they find each other here.

The Hague Public Library is so much more than a place where books are kept. New challenges lie ahead of us. Challenges I think we should take on. Yesterday, things were good. Tomorrow, though, they’ll be better! With this idea in mind, I am pleased to welcome you. Let’s share our knowledge and talk with each other about the future of the library. To put it in cyclists’ terms, ‘let’s gear up’. The world around us is changing rapidly. So we have to step up our own pace.

But the library is in good condition. So I foresee no problems, only challenges. Let’s take them on together.

Ingrid Van Engelshoven, Deputy Mayor


A greeting from Herman Van Rompuy

rompuy

We are proud to publish a special greeting to Cycling for libraries tour from Herman Van Rompuy, the President of the European Council. This greeting is a very nice surprise for many reasons. It’s an invitation to us all to cycle to Belgium, it’s a haiku and it contains a very beautiful and the true idea. It reads as follows:

Lezers van boeken
Verbonden door één verhaal
Vormen een ketting.

Straight translation is roughly as follows:

Readers of books
Connected by a story
Form a chain.

Herman_Van_Rompuy_at_the_37th_G8_Summit_in_Deauville_030

Herman Van Rompuy, the President of the European Council
Herman Van Rompuy in Facebook


Greetings from Muntpunt in Brussels

Cycling for libraries is coming to Belgium, whoohoo! Muntpunt is very exited about your visit to Brussels. As the metropolitan library, of course located in the beautiful city of Brussels, we hope you will find your way to our brand new building and to all the other gorgeous sites in the Belgian capital.

We wish you a great, safe and meaningful trip and hope to see you in Brussels!

Muntpunt

muntpunt

 


Greetings from the flemish library and archive association VVBAD

We are thrilled to hear Cycling for Libraries is coming to Belgium this year! Cycling is a popular sport in Flanders and we have a well developed and extensive network of public libraries. Cycling & libraries: we know it is a winning combination!

Our association was founded in 1921, at the time the first public library act was established in Belgium. So, we have a long tradition of bringing librarians (and archivists) together around their common interests and values, of which freedom of information  is the central one.

Cycling for libraries is a wonderful grassroots events. We will encourage our flemish colleagues to join and we will support the event where ever we can. We hope together we can raise the interest of the press, the public and the politicians for the important role public libraries play in society.

We look forward to welcoming you!

Bruno Vermeeren
Co-ordinator VVBAD

VVBAD_T_rgb


Page 1 of 6123...Last

Categories

Archives